Dog Behavior Changes After Moving

Dog Behavior Changes After Moving
Edward R. Forte October 12, 2021

Training & Behavior

Dog Behavior Changes After Moving

Some dogs are relatively happy-go-lucky and don’t appear too fazed after moving from one house to the next.But for other dogs, being uprooted from their familiar surroundings and put into a new home can be downright traumatic.By following simple dog obedience training tips online or enlisting the help of an experience (rewards-based) dog trainer, you can help teach or reinforce basic obedience commands like sit, stay, heel, and come.Rather than feeling out of control, your dog will be better able to relax once they know to follow your commands and lay in their bed for a while, for example.Such training techniques will also greatly assist in keeping any aggression or dominant behavior under control when your dog comes into contact with other neighboring animals.All dogs should understand basic obedience commands, but if your dog has never been trained or may have forgotten what they learned in puppy preschool, now is the time to get those basics back under control.One of the most important tips for moving with a dog is to make sure your dog is wearing an ID tag that has your current cell phone number, not any landline numbers.Start by assembling some packing boxes in front of your dog, while rewarding them for calm, positive behavior.Some dogs won’t like the sound of packing tape, so start by using it at a distance and then slowly and calmly move closer to your dog, rewarding them for staying calm.By giving your dog early exposure to the sights and sounds of packing, they will gradually get used to the changes happening in and around their home.Most dogs, if exposed correctly, enjoy spending time relaxing in a crate.However, when moving with an older dog or a dog very attached to their home and routine, one of the kindest things you can do is to take your dog’s current unwashed bed or crate with you and set it up in the new home before you arrive.On moving day and ideally the night before, reduce your dog’s food intake by about one third.Dogs can experience motion sickness just as humans can, and your dog will be much more comfortable on a long car trip or even in an airplane without the pressure of a full stomach of food.Motion sickness can last even after the trip is over, and your dog will feel much more comfortable having small servings of easily digestible food until their stomach is back under control.As an added bonus, if you make the effort to stay calm and cool under pressure, you will most likely notice your own stress levels reducing in the process.A boarding kennel or doggy day-care facility can give you peace of mind knowing that your dog is safe and being well looked after, while you take care of everything that needs to happen on moving day.If this isn’t possible, or you don’t think your dog will be too badly affected, move their bed, toys, and favorite items into a quiet, safe room that is least likely to have foot traffic, such as a bathroom or laundry.Put a sign on the door to let everyone know that your dog is inside and shouldn’t be disturbed.This is the best way of ensuring your dog doesn’t become lost, injured, or overly upset while everything goes on around them.In the house, are there exposed electrical cords that your dog might be tempted to chew on?Can you see any pest control poisons or cleaning products at your dog’s level?In both cases, the dogs are simply exploring and learning everything they can about their new environment.It would also help to bring some of your dog’s unwashed blankets, bedding, and toys with you from your old home so they don’t feel the need to mark their territory on everything.That’s why leaving them alone in their new home for the first time must be handled with care.Say goodbye to your dog, give them their food or treat, and then leave.Even if your dog has moved house before, they are likely to react with confusion and some potentially destructive behaviors when the process starts again.Now is the time that it’s vitally important to show compassion and understanding towards your dog.If one or both dogs are aggressive, fearful, or have health concerns, it may take several meetings on neutral territory before the dogs are comfortable and familiar with each other.Prior to both dogs being in the same house together, plan ahead and remove anything that could cause competition between the dogs, including food, toys, beds, bowls, and blankets.If the dogs consistently show friendly, positive behavior towards each other, then they can eventually be left unsupervised together, but this will need to happen at a gradual pace.It is most important when moving house with pets that all necessary precautions are taken to minimize the chance of aggression or negative interactions.Your dog will also need plenty of time alone with you to get some personal attention from their favorite person, without always having to share you with the other adults, children, and pets in the house.By planning ahead and getting everything set up in advance, you will be able to prepare your dog and turn what could otherwise be a traumatic, anxiety-inducing experience into a fun adventure of exploration.Dogs have very different ways of exploring new territory than humans do.If your dog suffers from anxiety or has trouble relaxing, the hustle and bustle of moving day could be too much for them to handle.A boarding kennel or doggy day-care facility can give you peace of mind knowing that your dog is safe and being well looked after, while you take care of everything that needs to happen on moving day.That’s why leaving them alone in their new home for the first time must be handled with care.Say goodbye to your dog, give them their food or treat, and then leave.Your dog will also need plenty of time alone with you to get some personal attention from their favorite person, without always having to share you with the other adults, children, and pets in the house.Now is the time to show compassion and understanding towards your dog.By planning ahead and getting everything set up in advance, you will be able to prepare your dog and turn what could otherwise be a traumatic, anxiety-inducing experience into a fun adventure of exploration.Between arranging mortgage or rent payments, setting up new utilities, packing, cleaning, hiring movers or convincing your friends to help out, there is a lot to coordinate and never enough time.So our pets tend to get even more stressed than us during a big move.Your dog may start showing destructive or attention seeking behaviors such as chewing, digging, barking, or even going to the bathroom in your house, something they haven’t done since they were a puppy!These signs can include panting, pacing, yawning, lip licking, whining, clinginess, and even diarrhea.While trying to get everything done, you must adjust all of your routines and priorities.Sometimes scheduling in your dog’s daily walk just isn’t possible.There are many different options such as thunder shirts, calming pheromones, supplements, and medication that could help reduce your pup’s stress.Much like people, all animals will respond to moving and stress differently. .

Helping Your Dog Adjust to a New Home

There’s no way you can avoid some of the unpleasantness of moving, but there are ways that you can ease your dog’s transition to a new home.Have the boxes and other gear like packing tape, newsprint, and bubble wrap in your house way ahead of packing and moving so your dog can get used to them.If you can make a lot of time to take your dog out for walks, classes, or for playtime, so much the better, but even a little goes a long way.Sometimes being out for a walk with another family member may be an option that allows you to pack without stressing out your dog.All of the changes associated with moves are inherently stressful, so do what you can to keep some things the same for your dog.If you have to change things up because of a new job or other commitments, try to keep as much of the old routine in place as possible for at least a couple of weeks.Yes, I know it’s discouraging to bring a nasty, fur-covered old dog bed and water bowls with dings in them into your new home, but those things are comforting to your dog, so don’t take them away.The problem is that when you move, you can become overwhelmed with so many details to attend to and all the work that has to be done.It’s unrealistic to think that you will be able to do as much for your dog as you could if you weren’t moving, but commit to spending quality time with him every day and that will help him out a lot.Try to wait as long as you can before leaving your dog alone at the new house, even if that means awkwardly taking him everywhere for a few days or so.You can add those familiar smells to your house faster by spending time on the floor with your dog.Being on the floor together also adds to the time you spend giving him the loving that he needs during this stressful time.Some dogs will be perfectly comfortable within a few days, many take a few weeks to settle in and some dogs can take months or more to feel at home in a new place. .

BEWARE: your dog's behavior might change when you move to a

If you seem unsure in a new house, we might try to claim territory in that new house so we feel more comfortable.You can also bring some of our favorite items with scents we already are familiar with to the new home so we know this is our place.The most important thing is to be patient with us as we adjust and to keep loving us.To all my dog friends who are moving, don’t worry, your parents will take great care of you! .

Depression in Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, Treatments, and More

Out of the blue, your usually energetic pooch is withdrawn and listless.When Jodie Richers’ dog, Bada, died in 2002, her two other dogs, Terrace and Pumba, went through a mourning period.“She just got worse and worse,” Richers said. .

How To Ease Your Dog's Anxiety When Moving To A New Home

Anxiety, on the other hand, is when a dog thinks that a situation may happen, such as separation anxiety when you put your shoes on, take your coat out and get ready to leave.This is an instinct in most dogs and a big part of how they survive.Most fears, anxieties and phobias develop during a dog’s life, especially after they are one year old.Some anxious feelings do not develop until the dog is of senior age and has other health problems that play a part in their anxiety.Indoor “accidents”, bad chewing behavior and whining, barking or howling may be signs that your dog has a bone to pick with you.Their mouth may look like a grimace or be tightly closed.On the other hand, some dogs show stress by panting or holding their breath.If allowed to progress, there may be stronger symptoms of anxiety.Obviously if you are moving quite a distance away from your current home this would not be possible.However, if you are moving nearby, visit your soon-to-be new home as many times as you can with your dog before moving in full time.All these activities will not only get your dog used to the sights, sounds and scents of the new home, but they will leave your scent behind as well. .

Moving with Your Dog

When introduced into a household where there are new pets or people, problems might arise.If, in your current home, your dog does not have his own bed or specific place to eat, it might be helpful to establish these before your move, and then set up the bed and a specific eating area when you move into your new home (see handout "Using Enrichment, Predictability and Scheduling to Train Your Dog").You can introduce your dog to your new home by showing him around, indoors and outdoors, with a happy voice, treats, and play.It is best to spend time with your dog in your new home for the first few days as he becomes familiar with his new environment.The pheromone diffuser, Adaptil®, might help your dog to more quickly settle into his new home.How long will it take for my dog to settle in?If the routines in your new home are different from your previous one, it may take longer to settle in."Toys, playtime, and treats can help the move be a positive experience for your dog.".No doubt the biggest concern will be the introduction of your dog to new family members – people and pets.Dogs that are fearful, aggressive, or overly playful and inquisitive when meeting other people or pets may need some extra time, effort and training to help them interact in a socially acceptable manner (see handout "Introducing a New Dog to Your Family Dog").Before the move, take some time to train your dog or review previous training, and consider additional controls, such as a head halter, if you do not have sufficient verbal control.If your dog is comfortable in a crate, it can be used as a safe place in your dog’s the new environment (see handout "How to Crate Train Your Dog").New dog-to-other-pet relationships may be based on a wide variety of factors, including previous familiarity with other kinds of pets; how the dog historically gets along with other pets; which pet, if any, is preexisting in the household; how the existing pets react to new animals on their property; and the specific factors that are unique to each relationship.When introducing your dog into a home with one or more new dogs, it might be best to have the dogs interact with one another on neutral territory on one or more occasions before the move.Providing separate feeding areas and sleeping areas for each dog may be advisable at first, to prevent competition over these resources.When introducing your dog into a new home with one or more new cats, both the dog's response to the cat and the cat's response to the dog must be considered.The initial introduction of your dog to the household cat should be taken slowly and done in a controlled environment, with your dog on leash and a head halter and giving favorite rewards for acceptable responses."The initial introduction of your dog to the household cat should be taken slowly and done in a controlled environment, with your dog on leash and a head halter and giving favorite rewards for acceptable responses.".When introducing your dog into a new home with new children and family members, do whatever you can to associate all that is positive in your dog’s day (exercise, play, treats, food, and reward training) with the new people in the household."Associate all that is positive in your dog’s day with the new people in the household.". .

Why Is My Dog Peeing in the House After Moving?

Rest assured, you are not alone; many dogs behave this way, and some cats do the same.Raise your hand if moving hasn't caused at least a little stress or loss of sleep.While Rover couldn't care less about switching utilities, filling out an address-change form, or driving across states, rest assured the move will be stressful for him.Well, for starters, it's very likely they have picked up some of your anxious energy.You may be moving quickly, talking fast, and doing lots of things all at once.Rover may see boxes, moving trucks, and lots of furniture being moved around.Not only that, but his feeding and elimination routine may change as you move to a different time zone, find new places to potty, and possibly change his feeding schedule.For instance, if you are mostly seeing inappropriate urination, you may be dealing with a dog urinary tract infection, decreased muscle tone of the urethral sphincter, bladder stones, or something else.As much as you may find it odd for Rover to develop a medical condition right now, keep in mind that stress does make a dog much more vulnerable to illnesses.For instance, some dogs when stressed may start "marking" in the home.Feeding them at the same time each day will also help since this makes their bowel movement more predictable and "on schedule.".French veterinarian Patrick Pageat felt the use of such pheromones might help calm stressed adult dogs.You can find DAP under the form of sprays, diffusers, and collars.Soon a vicious circle forms and she will continue to use those areas because they smell like "bathroom.".It is not meant to substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, or formal and individualized advice from a veterinary medical professional.Animals exhibiting signs and symptoms of distress should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.My dog gets lazy and pees in the house everytime we change routine.we had family move out of our spare room and now if we forget to shut the door he uses it as his personal facilities even if he has been outside recently.If there are new noises, keep the TV or radio on to cover them up.He did poop in the house when we were packing up to move, so I let that go.He is potty trained BTW and had a full vet check up the week after we got here.I hired a lovely dog walker to come wlk him mid-day every day because that's what he had in KC.I feel like he is having extreme separation anxiety since we moved - scared all of the time and acting super clingy and weirder than normal;) I'm sort of at a loss.I wonder if your former home was bigger, maybe with this downgrade they have easier access to the yard and make it on time?See I can't find anything on this anywhere; but for us it was the opposite.Cathy, thanks for stopping by, I am happy you found my article on dogs having accidents after moving interesting!Fortunately I won't be moving any time soon, but it's good to know anyway. .

Ten Reasons Your Dog May Develop Behavior Problems

A solid foundation in positive training gets you off to great start, either with that new puppy or with your older dog.But training has to be more than just a foundation, especially if there are any undesirable canine behaviors on the scene.Reason #3: Health Problems.If aggression or another behavior issue shows up suddenly, contact your vet.If they do not, the chance of your puppy having a poor temperament is very high.Sometimes, with very good socialization, you can override poor genetics, but often even with the best socialization program there are behavior issues if your dog has lost the gene pool lottery.If you sometimes let your dog jump on you because you're wearing casual clothes, but at other times punish him jumping, how fair is this to your dog?If you want your dog not to do something, be consistent by making that clear to him in a kind manner.If your dog jumps, for example, take time to practice sitting with positive reinforcement (providing something your dog likes such as treats or play immediately after the behavior) and ignore your dog completely if he jumps.Dog barks more, you scold more, dog barks more, and on and on it goes.Teaching your dog not to jump up, or training to eliminate any undesirable behavior, takes patience, consistency, and knowing what to ignore and what to reward.Reason #7: Changes in Routine.Changing the routine can be stressful for your dog, and may cause your dog to act out.Changing the routine can be stressful for your dog, and may cause your dog to act out.Reason #8: Changes in Diet.Switching your dog's diet to something that is of poor quality or that doesn't agree with him may change how the dog acts.Reason #9: Poor Socialization or Negative Socialization.for a well-balanced dog.The period from 3-16 weeks of age is the most critical socialization period.This time lays a foundation for a well-balanced dog.Reason #10: Fear Periods or Adolescence.Depending on the breed and bloodlines of your dog, your dog may experience more or fewer fear periods.Of course, if your dog's behavior problems are severe, look for a reputable trainer to help you. .

How to Stop Sudden Aggression in a Dog

In the meantime, handle the dog in a careful, nonaggressive way and take action to manage its aggression until you're able to figure out what's causing it and ideally find a safe, workable solution.Dog aggression toward people may involve a variety of behaviors such as barking, lunging, snarling, growling, snapping, nipping, and biting.It's not normal when a happy, loving dog suddenly exhibits aggressive behavior for no obvious reason.This is especially common as your dog becomes a senior and begins to develop age-related diseases.If your dog's aggression is accompanied by other symptoms, like hair loss, weight gain, or lethargy, it could be a sign of hypothyroidism.If eating makes your dog grumpy, a dental issue may be the cause.Anything that looks out of the ordinary could be hurting your dog and causing aggression.It might be a daunting prospect if the dog is feeling snappy, but the problem could be something as simple as a piece of food, toy, or stick caught in your dog's teeth.If the dog has undergone a personality change, this is serious, and you need to find out what's wrong. .

Dog Behavior Problems - Aggression - Children

However, fearful or aggressive dogs pose an enormous risk to a child’s safety.According to the CDC, 800,000 people seek medical attention for dog bites each year, half of which are children.Children under 4 years old are most likely bitten in the head or neck due to their height.During their socialization period (6 to 14 weeks of age), puppies are highly curious and impressionable.If your dog shows any signs of aggression, seek professional help immediately before these habits become ingrained.Muzzle dogs when around children if they have shown any aggression in the past.Do not use punishment for bad behavior or disobedience as this can greatly increase a dog’s fear and make them more aggressive.Make sure you have good verbal control of your dog (sit, down, come, drop it).What can be done if my dog is already showing some aggression toward children?Even if the dog has had several positive encounters with children, an adult should closely monitor all interactions.Watch for subtle signs of canine fear or stress: yawning, lip licking, trembling, crouching, ears down, tail tucked.Signs of aggression and potential for escalation to a bite include barking, hair standing on end, snarling, growling, or snapping.Give the dog basic commands (e.g., sit, down, shake) and reward these tasks with favored treats.This process can be greatly facilitated by teaching relax and settle commands to help the dog remain calm.A gentle leader head halter can also be an invaluable tool during this process.Classical conditioning is another excellent tool for helping dogs become more comfortable around children.In this way, the dog will learn to associate children with getting tasty treats.Children should be positively rewarded for good interaction and immediately stopped if they are acting inappropriately.Do not touch any dog that is showing signs of fear or aggression.If an aggressive dog approaches, stand very still and stay quiet “like a tree.”.We must do a better job of preparing our children how to act around dogs.We must also train and socialize our dogs to expect the unpredictable things children do. .

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